George Weigel

Not Forgotten

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Tag: Ukraine

Icons on Ammo Boxes

Throughout the 20th century—the greatest period of martyrdom in history—persecuted Christians used the dross of this world to make religious artifacts. Rosaries were constructed from bits and pieces of this-and-that.

Eastern Catholics and the Universal Church

The Ukrainian Greek Catholic Archeparchy of Philadelphia celebrated the enthronement of its new Metropolitan-Archbishop, Borys Gudziak, on June 4. The ceremony in the archeparchy’s Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception was

Homecoming

In the mid-1980s, my wife and I were invited to a baptism and to the post-christening reception at the home of the newborn’s parents. During the latter festivities, I was

In Ukraine, a Seismic Ecclesiastical Shift

The creation of the Orthodox Church of Ukraine (OCU) on December 15, at a Unification Council in Kyiv attended by representatives of three previously divided Orthodox jurisdictions in Ukraine, is

An Orthodox Fracture with Serious Consequences

While Catholicism has been embroiled in a crisis of sexual abuse and episcopal malfeasance reaching to the highest levels of the Church, Eastern Orthodoxy may be on the verge of

Freedom Is Never Free

When I first visited Lviv, the principal city of western Ukraine, in 2002, the transportation from plane to airport terminal was an old bus towed by a Soviet-era tractor; today,

“Equilibrium” and Ignominy

This past December 18, Metropolitan Hilarion of Volokolamsk, the head of the department of external relations of the Russian Orthodox Church, received an honorary degree from the Faculty of Theology

The Remarkable Life of Lubomyr Husar . . .

How does it happen that a child growing up in eastern Galicia among Ukrainians, Poles, Moldovans, Germans, Austrians, Jews, Roma, and Armenians dodges Nazi death squads and the Red Army,

Bitter Harvest and the Bitter Present in Ukraine

The Ukrainian term “Holodomor” has yet to enter the world’s genocide vocabulary, as “Shoah” and “Cambodia” and “Rwanda” have done. But we should hope that the world soon becomes as