U.S. Affairs

Before the 2020 Presidentiad Begins in Earnest . . .

Americans not obsessed with politics—that is, most Americans—will start paying serious attention to the 2020 presidential race after the February 3 Iowa caucuses and the February 11 New Hampshire primary—or

Fearlessness and the American Bishops in Rome

I once knew a Congregationalist minister—Yale Divinity School graduate, decorated World War II chaplain, veteran campaigner for then-unpopular liberal causes—of whom it was said (sometimes by himself) that “David Colwell

Biden, Bernardin, and Today

Given the seriousness with which the post-Watergate Washington Post takes itself, it seems unlikely that its editors strive for hilarity in devising headlines. Whatever their intention, though, they managed the not-inconsiderable feat

Truth-Telling and Big Abortion

For over a half-century, what styles itself the “pro-choice” movement has thrived because of its extraordinary ability to mask what it’s really about—the willful taking of innocent human lives in

The Ever-Present Totalitarian Temptation

First circulated underground in communist Czechoslovakia in October 1978, Václav Havel’s brilliant dissection of totalitarianism, “The Power of the Powerless,” retains its salience four decades later. It should be required

The Moral Depravity of Andrew Cuomo & Friends

Writing recently on women seeking the presidency and the “likability” factor in our politics, Peggy Noonan made a tart observation: “There are a lot of male candidates with likability problems.

Why 42 Had to Be Impeached Twenty Years Ago

Twenty years ago this month, I found myself seriously double-booked, so to speak. The editing of the first volume of my John Paul II biography, Witness to Hope, was entering the

The Kavanaugh Battle, Viewed from Rome

The Eternal City may seem an odd place from which to get some perspective on the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation battle; Italy these days is being its usual, ungovernable self, and

Roe v. Wade Derangement Syndrome

The defense of the indefensible often leads to a kind of derangement in otherwise rational people. That was the case with the defenders of slavery and legalized racial segregation; it

Democracy and Its Discontents

This essay is adapted from George Weigel’s 17th William E. Simon Lecture, delivered in Washington on March 6, 2018. Click here to listen to an audio recording of the lecture.

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