U.S. Affairs

Mrs. Roosevelt’s Confusions, Revisited

In all of this, there are welcome signs of progress in what Winston Churchill once called “the hard march of man.” But there is also a great paradox. For these

Politics, Politics . . .

In these United States, that phrase “the rule of law” is often taken to be a piety in the civics books; the notion of being a law-governed polity rarely stirs

Political Paralysis

The social rot of American life, as Mahbubani perceives it, has had enormous political consequences, which are intensified by the harsh reality of an irresponsible press and pusillanimous politicians:  

National Endowment for Democracy

Virtually every word or phrase in the lexicon of time-hallowed Washington homage fits the National Endowment for Democracy (NED): “bipartisan,” “cost-effective,” “practical,” “timely,” “on the cutting-edge,” “inspiring,” “visionary,” etc. etc.

The Freedom Offensive

The idea that the United States ought to help fellow democrats abroad, for reasons both practical and altruistic, did not, of course, originate with the National Endowment for Democracy. A

The Reagan Initiative

Ten years after Douglas’s book, President Ronald Reagan gave the new thinking real political impetus when he addressed the British House of Commons in historic Westminster Hall. There, on June

An American Argument, a European Revolution

These definitional arguments—and the ways in which they were manipulated by dictators of all stripes (but pre-eminently by Communists and their Western apologists)—shaped the foreign-policy debate in the United States

Getting It Less-Than-Half Right

The Bangkok Declaration was, among other things, a gauntlet thrown down before the Clinton administration. The Vienna Conference would be the first major international human rights meeting in which the

The Question of U.S. Military Intervention

In the just-war tradition, the use of proportionate and discriminate military force derives its moral legitimacy from its capacity to advance a just political goal. The end does not justify

After the Twin Towers Attack

Those who think that Americans are permitted a certain indifference to passions and politics beyond the water’s edge might have been shaken out of their insouciance had they been driving

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